Friday, November 30, 2012

'Upton Pyne'

'Upton Pyne', the Mrs. Percy Pyne estate designed by Clinton & Russell c. 1899 in Bernardsville, New Jersey.  She was the daughter of Moses Taylor, head of the National City Bank.  She passed away shortly after the residence was completed and it was inherited by her son Percy R. Pyne II.  Her other son Moses Taylor Pyne resided at 'Drumthwacket' in Princeton, N.J.  'Upton Pyne' was destroyed by fire in 1982.  Click HERE to see the stables from 'Upton Pyne' on bing, which have since been converted to a private residence.  Photo from Architecture, 1900.

9 comments:

The Down East Dilettante said...

Of course, there is also the very handsome Georgian style Pyne townhouse by McKim Mead etc., and Pyne's later country house by Cross & Cross at Roslyn.

The Down East Dilettante said...

On closer examination, are we certain that this isn't actually the Percy Rivington Pyne I estate? 1930's Social Registers have Percy Pyne at Upton Pyne in Bernardsville, and Percy Pyne II at Rivington House in Roslyn.

Zach said...

You know...when I wrote this I thought that said Mr. Percy Pyne but it says Mrs.

And since Pyne I died in 1895 it would make sense this would be for Mrs. Pyne.

My mistake.

The Down East Dilettante said...

The current icky mcmansion that replaced the original Upton Pyne is for sale:

http://uptonpyne.turpinrealtors.com/

As is the seriously charming stable and coachman's cottage converted to a residence the the Pyne's daughter, Mrs. Suydam Cutting:

http://www.luxuryportfolio.com/property/bernardsville_boro/once_part_of_the_original_upton_pyne_estate.cfm

ChipSF said...

Some further info - Mary Pyne Filley Cutting had William Stone Post of George B. Post & Sons convert the coachman's cottage to the current 15,000 s.f. house. This is the hose Zach links to on Bing - not for sale. The circular, domed diningroom is in the foreground.

The house that is for sale, is a 10,000 s.f. house and is slightly to the west. It is a coversion of the stables for William & Dorothy Armour by F. Burrall Hoffman, Jr. c. 1938.

Mrs. Cutting is quoted as calling the decision to demolish Upton Pyne the "...most difficult decision of my life."

ChipSF said...

Some further info - Mary Pyne Filley Cutting had William Stone Post of George B. Post & Sons convert the coachman's cottage to the current 15,000 s.f. house c. 1935. This is the house Zach links to on Bing - not for sale. The circular, domed diningroom is in the foreground.

The house converted from the stables, the one that is for sale, is a 10,000 s.f. house and is north and slightly to the west on Campbell Rd. It was a conversion of the stables for William & Dorothy Armour by F. Burrall Hoffman, Jr. c. 1938.

Mrs. Cutting is quoted as calling the decision to demolish Upton Pyne the "...most difficult decision of my life."

The Down East Dilettante said...

Chip, correction: both houses are for sale---one of my links above is to the listing for Mrs. Cutting's converted carriage house.

My pressing question for the day is why Percy Rivington Pyne II of Upton Pyne, and his son Percy Pyne, Jr. of Rivington House--also referred to as Percy Pyne II referred to themselves--thus making the next two Percy Pynes in the line, III and IV, rather than IV & V, which they actually are, all descendants of the Percy Rivington Pyne, married to Albertina Taylor, who was the first. So how did two generations following each other both become II?

The Down East Dilettante said...

OOOOOPS!!! I re-read again, and stand corrected about stables. Intersting to know Hoffman did it. He certainly designed some lovely smaller houses after Vizcaya--his own in Hobe sound is one of my favorites.

Kellsboro Jack said...

As an aside, I'd highly recommend to anyone if they don't have the set to acquire the late John k. Turpin's books on 'The Somerset Hills' which have great picks of Upton Pyne prior to its ugly transformation into whatever it is now.

Mr. Turpin took advantage of his years and years of selling these homes (multiple times on occasion) to give more detail than many other historical architectural books. I've long wished that someone at one of the big Long Island firms would do the same after decades of squiring away brochures, paying for photo shoots to market properties and of course courting the owners at parties ...

http://www.mountaincolonypress.com/