Wednesday, May 16, 2012

The Louis Stern Residence

 The Louis Stern residence designed by Schickel & Ditmars c. 1887 at 993 Fifth Avenue in New York City.  Stern was a founding member of Stern Brothers, dry goods merchants.  His brother Isaac lived in a Schickel & Ditmars designed residence down the block at 858 Fifth Avenue seen HERE.  Stern was arrested in Kissingen, Germany in August 1895, charged with "insulting Baron von Thuengen, Deputy Commissioner of the Spa" and sentenced to 14 days in jail and a $7,000 fine. Stern had tried to bring his son into the Kur Garden where children under 15 were not permitted and was stopped by the Deputy who did not believe his son to be of appropriate age.  Words were exchanged and Stern resisted arrest.  He promptly left Bavaria after his conviction in order to avoid serving his sentence.  An attempt at obtaining a pardon was refused.  The Stern residence was razed in 1929 and replaced with an apartment building with the same address.












Photos from Architecture, 1901.

8 comments:

Brian said...

So modern to have one master bedroom with two bathrooms! The Sterns must have been like bunnies.

The Down East Dilettante said...

Lotta razzle and dazzle in those interiors

archibuff said...

Incredible conservatory fountain and stained glass windows. Would love those carved figurine brackets on each side of the library fireplace and at the rooms entry. Can only imagine how little was salavged when this home was demolished in 1929.

Zach said...

The NYTimes article says that the Stern place was razed along with 11 other residences to be replaced with 4 new apartment buildings.

The turnover in NYC between 1929-1931 probably rivals c. 1964.

The Down East Dilettante said...

Except for the quality of the apartment buildings---29-31 saw far better ones than 64.

Doug Floor Plan said...

Very nice floor plan; but I can't figure out the photograph of the entry hall -- it doesn't seem to match up to any place on the ground floor; note the stairs are reflected in the mirrored doors. I guess we'll never know.

Anonymous said...

VERY NICE FLOOR PLAN INDEED. The photo of the stairs appears exactly as the first floor plan depicts, full height columns define the opening into the grand stair hall directly off the main hall, glass doors on the left open into the dining room vestibule, doors on the right open directly into the drawing room.

The Ancient said...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nypl/3523617581/sizes/o/in/set-72157618018834234/